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    Climate action dashboard: Trends in public opinion 2020-2023
  • Jan '24
    Comment: Why should we care about climate emotions?
  • Nov '23
    Comment: Is ‘behaviour change’ a contentious topic or an essential part of net zero?
  • Oct '23
    Climate Change Committee: How behaviour change can become part of UK climate policies
  • Oct '22
    Climate anxiety around the world
  • Sep '22
    Briefing paper: The road to net zero – UK public preferences for low-carbon lifestyles
  • Jun '21
    Britain Talks Climate – which segments are engaging in behaviour change?
  • Jan '21
    Climate Outreach resource: Lifestyle change & system change are two sides of the same coin
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Behaviour change

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    Policy Insight 11th October 2023

    Climate Change Committee: How behaviour change can become part of UK climate policies

    A wide-ranging analysis from the centre for Climate Change & Social Transformations (CAST) on behalf of the Climate Change Committee (CCC) reveals that substantial behaviour change is required across society to reach the UK’s ambitious net-zero 2050 target, with 60% of reductions needing to come from (or at least be endorsed by) consumers

    In a series of recommendations for mainstreaming behaviour change approaches as part of the UK’s approach to climate policy, the report argues that:

    The provision of information is important in some circumstances – for example for young people choosing a green career –  and can provide a rationale for wider policy interventions. But the provision of information alone is not enough to shift consumption behaviours in society

    Climate policies which are perceived to be fair are more likely to be acceptable to the public.

    The public largely support a reduction in the consumption of red meat and dairy, with many already reducing their consumption of beef, pork and dairy products…altering the food environment, for example by taxing high-carbon foods, labelling, subsidising meat-free options, and increasing plant-based options, would be likely to encourage further (and more equitable) behaviour change

    Many of those who fly are reluctant to reduce their air travel because of its associations with pleasure, freedom, and social status (although recent studies suggest social norms around flying may be shifting). Strategies targeting individuals, such as increasing climate awareness or concern don’t typically result in behaviour change when it comes to air travel.

    However, a Frequent Flyer Levy or Frequent Air Miles Tax have the potential to be effective in reducing aviation demand and to be perceived as fair by the public.

    • Source: Climate Change Committee
    • Authors: Kaloyan Mitev, Lois Player, Caroline Verfuerth, Steve Westlake, Lorraine Whitmarsh
    • Date: 11th September 2023
    Opinion Insight 17th June 2021

    Britain Talks Climate – which segments are engaging in behaviour change?

    Grounded in More in Common’s ‘Britain’s Choice’ audience segmentation, Britain Talks Climate provides insights and guidance on how to engage the seven segments that span the breadth of British society.

    The two ‘Disengaged’ segments are the least likely to engage in low-carbon behaviours, although they are also likely to have among the lowest carbon footprints.

    Civic Pragmatists regularly give to charity, are highly involved in their local community and engage in a range of ‘personal’ low-carbon behaviours

    Progressive Activists are the most likely to engage in a range of low-carbon behaviours

    From the Climate Community 19th January 2021

    Climate Outreach resource: Lifestyle change & system change are two sides of the same coin

    This short animation from Climate Outreach makes the case that ‘behaviour change’ and ‘system change’ are not mutually exclusive, as some advocates suggest.

    Instead, they should be seen as ‘two sides of the same coin’, with individual action part of broader engagement with climate change and one way in which people can build a sense of agency and ‘efficacy’ (that their actions matter).

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